Manzhouli’s Cabbage Bazaar

One day while walking through Manzhouli, I stumbled upon an outdoor bazaar. Like most markets in China, this was a vibrant place, with a wide variety of fruits and vegetables for sale. It was also crowded, with hordes of people and vehicles jockeying for position in the street. I love walking through bazaars; they give me a sense of day-to-day existence in faraway places. Cultural differences can put up barriers between me and the local people, but markets also help me connect me with others in this shared journey through life.

Here are a few photos I took in the Mazhouli market.

Read More »

Blood Moon Train to Beijing

After the sun had set, I tried to explain a special event that was about to take place: a total lunar eclipse, where the sun’s rays would be refracted upon hitting the Earth, turning the moon red. I took out my phone and showed my new friends the Chinese character for “eclipse.” Then I showed them the character for “blood,” since this type of eclipse is known as a “blood moon” in English. One of the men immediately understood and explained it to his friends. Some people sitting near us overheard the discussion and started making comments about the eclipse. Soon everyone in our car was looking for the blood moon.

Read More »

Hangzhou Ultimate

Last weekend my girlfriend Katie and I traveled to Hangzhou, China for an ultimate frisbee tournament. OK, to set the record straight, she played and I came to watch. This was a “hat tournament,” where teams are chosen somewhat randomly, although they make sure every team has a few experienced players and some beginners to balance it out. It was a fun tournament with lots of competitive play. I broke out my telephoto lens to photograph one of Katie’s games. Here are the highlights:

Read More »

End of the World

Whenever I travel to a new city, I like to check out the local music scene. Luckily, in Beijing this was an easy task. End of the World, a local ska/punk band is made almost entirely of BIBA teachers. They mostly play original music, and they are a ton of fun to watch. I have gone to two of their shows, one at the 798 Live House in Wanjing, and one at the Temple Bar in Dongcheng. If you’re in Beijing, you should check out one of their frequent shows.

Here are some photos of End of the World:
Read More »

Manzhouli: Land of Matryoshka Dreams

The hotel’s front desk was on the third floor. The manager, a middle-aged man with a comb-over and a leather jacket, held a cigarette between the index and middle fingers of his right hand while clicking his ancient computer’s mouse. He was playing solitaire. When he saw me walk up with my huge backpack, he took one last drag from his cigarette and stubbed it out in an ashtray, next to its brethren. To my relief, he told me that there were vacancies, and rooms were only 50 rmb. I had been prepared to spend many times that amount on this holiday weekend.

Read More »

The Greatest Pleasures of Travel

It was unlikely that I would visit this part of Inner Mongolia again, so I wanted to see a few more places before heading home. The problem was buying train tickets. I had discovered on this trip that you can’t just show up and expect to get a ticket for a long distance train. If you don’t want to stand for thirty hours straight, you need to book your tickets online, days or weeks in advance.

Now I would have to improvise my way to my next destination, without any idea of how to get there, or what I might do once I arrived. Ah yes, one of the greatest pleasures of travel…

Read More »

The Future of The Facebook

Irish author Catherine Ryan Howard is one of the top authorities on self-publishing today. Her delightfully quirky blog Catherine, Caffeinated is full of great advice. I recently asked Catherine the following:

Two years ago, [...] Facebook was easily the top social network for authors looking to reach new fans. Does that still hold true today? How about two years from now – do you foresee any other social networks taking Facebook’s place?

Her response:

Read More »

Moerdaoga: Tracing the Great Khan’s Footsteps

According to legend, early in the thirteenth century a nomadic tribal leader went on a hunting expedition to a mountain at the eastern edge of the Eurasian Steppe. As he stood on the summit, the spectacular view of the surrounding grasslands and forests inspired him. The man suddenly realized his desire to unify all of the tribes in the region. He gazed at the golden sunrise and commanded to his tribesmen, “Moerdaoga!” – “Ride into the battle on your horses!” The man’s name was Genghis Khan, and this land would soon fall under his rule.

Read More »

Beijing Hutongs, Part II

Are you planning a trip to Beijing? If so, then make sure you include a visit to a hutong in your itinerary. These shared-housing neighborhoods offer a fantastic real-life glimpse at traditional Chinese culture. Unfortunately, many of Beijing’s hutongs have been leveled in favor of apartment towers, but a few have received historical status, protecting them from demolition. Here are some pictures I took during a recent visit to the hutongs of Beijing’s Lake District.

Read More »

Riding the Rails to Moerdaoga

Beijing’s long-distance train station was huge. A massive pavilion was outside, and thousands of people with suitcases and backpacks were milling about. There was barely room to walk. Three men in camouflage uniforms stood guard at the edge of the crowd, assault rifles pointed downward, index fingers resting next to the triggers. Behind them was a van with blackened windows. Troublemakers wouldn’t last long here.

Read More »